Charlie Gard case: An attack on the family that should concern everyone

Posted July 11, 2017

Supporters hold placards as they wait for Connie Yates and Chris Gard, parents of terminally-ill 10-month-old Charlie Gard, prior to his parents delivering a petition of signatures supporting their case to the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in central London on July 9, 2017.

It ruled the children's hospital could turn off his life support.

Professor Neena Modi, president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health said in an open letter that Charlie's situation is "heartbreaking" for his parents, but added that even well-meaning interventions from outsiders can be unhelpful.

Last week New-York Presybterian Hospital/Columbia University Irving Medical Center offered to admit Charlie and to provide him with experimental treatment, according to the Washington Post. "We're talking about world-class hospitals, first in the field, and that is what they prefer", she said.

Image Credit: PA / Daily Mail U.K."Despite Charlie's heartbreaking condition, his parents have refused to give up hope". Mr Gard yelled at a barrister representing Great Ormond Street bosses, saying: "When are you going to start telling the truth?"

"Two worldwide hospitals and their researchers have communicated to us as late as the last 24 hours that they have fresh evidence about their proposed experimental treatment".

"Two worldwide hospitals and their researchers have communicated to us as late as the last 24 hours that they have fresh evidence about their proposed experimental treatment", the hospital said in a statement.

A judge is overseeing the latest round of litigation at a High Court hearing in London after "new" evidence was presented.

Concerning the comments by Pope Francis and President Donald Trump in favor of Charlie Gard getting the treatment his parents want for him, Foster said it "was very effective" in raising awareness about the case and in bringing about the new hearing.

It comes after a proposal by Pope Francis to give Charlie a Vatican passport so he can be flown there for potentially life-saving treatment. However, Charlie's mother, Connie Yates, said on BBC 4's Today programme on Monday that her son is responsive, enjoying tickles and watching videos with his parents. It reads: "It is unacceptable that you have refused to follow the wishes of his parents and have instead chose to remove his life support, which will kill him".

But Charlie's parents took the matter to court, and eventually appealed their case to the European Court of Human Rights.

For those unfamiliar with the case in question, Charlie Gard was born in the United Kingdom in 2016 with mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, a severe condition that left him struggling for his life.

The nucleoside therapy offered in the United States has not yet been "sufficiently tested" on humans and makes no promises of success in Charlie's case.

Doctors there believe Gard's brain damage is "severe and irreversible" and have said the baby may be suffering, in contradiction to the parents' views. He stressed that while the therapy was a treatment, not a cure, his son was "getting stronger every day". "The specialists are in America and that's where we want to go".