Google appeals against huge European Union anti-trust fine

Posted September 12, 2017

Brussels accuses Google of giving its own service too much priority in search results to the detriment of other price comparison services, such as TripAdvisor and Expedia.

Tech giant Google has lodged an appeal against the 2.4bn euro fine (£2bn / $2.8bn) it was ordered to pay by the European Commission in June. The company declined to give further details of its appeal.

Google has already said it will comply with the changes to vertical search that Brussels requested, and has until September 27 to explain how it will put these into practice.

It took Intel the best part of eight years to obtain Wednesday's judgement, and the case isn't over yet, so Google is likely have a long legal battle ahead of it.

If it did not, the Commission said, it faced penalty payments of up to 5 per cent of the average daily worldwide turnover of Alphabet, which is Google's parent company.

The EU competition enforcer will defend its decision in court, a spokesman said.

Intel lost its first appeal, but persisted, and on Wednesday the case was referred back to the court that had rejected it with the instruction to allow Intel to challenge more of the evidence against it.

This action before the general court of the European Union, should further increase the tensions that last for seven years now between the Commission, guardian of competition in Europe, and the american giant of the Internet.

Regulators are also expected to levy fines in separate investigations into Google's Android mobile-phone software - possibly as soon as next month - and the AdSense advertising service.