U.S. bombers conduct military drills over Korean peninsula

Posted October 12, 2017

Let's start with Washington's latest show of force against North Korea The U.S. flew two B-1B strategic bombers over the Korean Peninsula late Tuesday. As part of the exercise, two American B-1 bombers and South Korean and Japanese fighter jets flew over the Korean Peninsula.

The information, that included wartime contingency plans drawn up by the US and South Korea, was from the country's defence ministry, according to Rhee Cheol-hee, a South Korean lawmaker.

According to South Korea's Yonhap news agency this is not the first time the communist regime to the north has launched a tirade of cyber attacks on the country, with hacks targeting government websites and facilities being commonplace in recent years.

The U.S. Air Force bombers and the South Korean fighters then conducted a second firing exercise over the Yellow Sea, according to the South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Russia's TASS news agency quoted North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho as saying: "With his bellicose and insane statement at the United Nations, Trump, you can say, has lit the wick of a war against us".

Rep. Lee Cheol-hee, a lawmaker for the ruling Democratic Party who sits on the National Defense Committee, said defense sources told him that North Korean hackers previous year stole the classified U.S. Defense officials refused to comment when reached by other media.

The U.S., South Korea and Japan conducted a joint military drill Tuesday night in the Far East region amid the heightened tensions between North Korea and America.

Documents including wartime contingency plans put together with the United States were stolen from South Korea's defence ministry.

North Korea has been conducting regular missile tests in recent months as well as testing a nuclear warhead in September, all part of its bid to establish a nuclear deterrent to what it sees as a military threat from the US.

President Trump hosted a discussion on options to respond to any North Korean aggression, or, if necessary, to prevent Pyongyang from threatening the United States and its allies with nuclear weapons, the White House said in a statement.

Rhee Cheol-hee, a South Korean lawmaker who sis on its parliamentary defence committee, said 235GB of military documents were swiped from the Defence Integrated Data Centre, adding that 80 per cent of these documents have yet to be identified.

If confirmed, the reported hacking attack by the North would be a major blow for South Korea at a time when its relations with rival North Korea are at a low point.