Facebook Wants Your Nude Pics Now To Stop Revenge Porn Later

Posted November 09, 2017

It's done by first contacting the e-safety commissioner or regional equivalent (e-safety commissioner is an Australian position, and this test is being carried out in Australia), after which, you will then be advised to send the photo to yourself.

Obviously, Facebook users are feeling concern about what the social media platform will do with the intimate images once they are uploaded.

Australia is one of them where Facebook has collaborated with a federal agency called e-Safety.

Say... what? Sending your nudes to social media in a bid to prevent your nudes appearing without your consent on social media seems counterintuitive, but Facebook reckons there's a solid plan behind it. If it succeeds, hopefully expect it rollout throughout the rest of the world if Facebook keeps getting government support.

"Yes, they're not storing a copy, but the image is still being transmitted and processed, leaving forensic evidence in memory and potentially on disk", digital forensics expert Lesley Carhart told Motherboard. The Telegraph reported that to provide the photos directly to Facebook, users should send them through the Messenger app. In most cases Facebook disables the account that shared the image.

The photos are then processed so Facebook's photo and face-matching algorithms can identify the photos if someone else tries to post them, and then block them.

Australia is one of four countries participating in the Facebook pilot program, Antigone Davis, Facebook's head of global security told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Facebook's customer support team will then review a blurred version of the image to ensure it's explicit, then "hash" it before deletion.

It's not known if the new pilot project in Australia will come to Canada or the U.S.

"They're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies", said Grant.

There are laws against revenge porn, but the scourge is hard to fight against in practical terms.

Roughly 4% of USA internet users have been victims of revenge porn, according to a 2016 report from the Data & Society Research Institute.

Facebook is taking drastic steps to stop revenge porn.

Facebook said it looked forward "to getting feedback and learning" from the trial.