Iran, China agree to maintain nuclear deal

Iran, China agree to maintain nuclear deal

French President Emmanuel Macron held phone talks with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin on Tuesday, according to a Kremlin statement, which said they had "confirmed Russia and France's commitment to make the deal work".

Russian media further cited Zarif as saying that Tehran and Moscow would do their utmost to keep the Iran deal in place less than a week after US President Donald Trump announced Washington's withdrawal from the JCPOA despite earlier worldwide warnings and pleas for the White House not to attack yet another global agreement.

Iran signed the nuclear deal in 2015 with the United States, as well as Britain, China, France, Germany and Russian Federation.

So far, China, France, Russia, Britain, the European Union and Iran remain in the accord, which placed controls on Iran's nuclear program and led to a relaxation of U.S. economic sanctions against Iran and companies doing business there.

At a dinner among the four countries' foreign ministers and the EU's top diplomat, the European powers will say that they stick by the terms of the 2015 pact giving Iran sanctions relief in return for an end to its nuclear ambitions.

He made the remarks in an interview with Fox News, after U.S. President Donald Trump withdrew from the deal on Tuesday.

Before leaving Tehran, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and EU Foreign Policy Chief Federica Mogherini in a telephone conversation discussed the fate of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) after the USA pullout, according to Fars.

National security adviser John Bolton said Sunday he believes European nations will ultimately join the US and leave the Iran nuclear agreement.

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Maas said the Europeans wanted to wanted to ensure that Iran would continue to abide by the rules and restrictions of the nuclear agreement.

The EU, which along with Germany, France, Britain, Russia, China and the United States, signed the nuclear accord with Iran, does have some steps it can take to shield European business in Iran.

"Our trade with New Zealand is the importing dairy products from NZ, if they want to impose sanctions then they must ban the companies from exporting the commodities to Iran".

When pressed on the matter further, he said, "I think the Europeans will see that it's in their interest ultimately to come along with us".

Mr Zarif said on his first stop, China, that he hoped to secure a "clear future design" for the agreement.

A number of European companies, including Airbus, Siemens and Total, had established operations in Iran since the signing of the deal.

Tehran has expressed its opposition to Trump's move.

Germany's minister for economic affairs Peter Altmaier said last week that Berlin will try to "persuade the United States government to change its behaviour". "Europeans are going to face the effective U.S. sanctions, already are really, because much of what they would like to sell to Iran involves United States technology, for which the licenses will not be available".

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