Lava from Hawaii volcano destroys hundreds more homes

Lava from Hawaii volcano destroys hundreds more homes

There was some confusion on Tuesday concerning Big Island Mayor Harry Kim's second home in Vacationland.

However, it was clear Monday that the vast majority of the approximately 500 homes in Kapoho Beach Lots and Vacationland are gone.

County officials said the two subdivisions have 279 homes, and most are feared destroyed from the most recent lava flows in the low-laying area.

County Managing Director Wil Okabe said his own vacation home in Kapoho Beach Lots was also threatened by lava.

Authorities began evacuating the greater Kapoho area last week and ushered most of the last remaining residents to safety early on Saturday, hours before the lava flow severed all road access to the region. The area is primarily home to vacation rentals, but there are a lot of permanent residences there too. The lava filling Kapoho Bay, an area that had been known for its tide pools and snorkeling, creates a delta of new earth more than a half-mile off the coastline.

Lava has been flowing from fissures that broke out in neighborhoods last month.

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410 people are staying at county shelters.

On Sunday, the flow crept toward Kapoho Bay, a roughly 1,000-foot-wide ocean retreat. His ocean-view property sits on a ridge near the base of Kapoho crater, and he thinks the lava could have missed it. More than 2,500 residents from the area have had to leave with more than 300 seeking refuge in nearby community centers.

"I left a lot of things behind because I didn't want to feel as if I was abandoning my home", Rahmer said.

Kathy Emery, who evacuated from her 5-acre farm in Kapoho, said she doesn't know if she has a home to go back to.

Carolyn Boudreault, a Kapoho resident who is now staying in Boston with her family, told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser that the bay was a treasured place.

"Destruction from the flow is just off the scale", said Ikaika Marzo, 34, a tour operator on the Big Island who has gained a large following on social media by meticulously documenting Kilauea's eruption. She said it would be some time before precise losses were confirmed.

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