Trump Administration Seeks Supreme Court Review of Immigration Case

Trump Administration Seeks Supreme Court Review of Immigration Case

President Donald Trump's administration asked the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday to allow it to end a program introduced by former President Barack Obama that protects thousands of young immigrants who live in the United States without legal status.

But the Supreme Court today said it has denied petitions filed by AT&T and broadband lobby groups NCTA, CTIA, USTelecom, and the American Cable Association. While neither of the latter Justices cited a reason for dismissing themselves from the appeal, Justice Kavanaugh had been involved in the initial ruling while seated on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals.

The request comes after the Supreme Court rejected a similar plea in February.

The California, New York and D.C. challenges were brought by DACA proponents seeking to block Trump's actions.

Three members of the Supreme Court - Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch - said they would have instead vacated the appeals court decision as moot, presumably because the commission reversed itself previous year, after a change in its membership.

The legality of the program is not at issue in the case. In the letter, Francisco told the justices that "prompt consideration" of the three cases is essential because nationwide injunctions require the administration to keep the program in place while the litigation challenging efforts to end it continues.

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The legal moves reflected a desire by conservatives and industry players to cement the FCC's repeal of net neutrality rules, which were created to restrict Internet service providers' ability to manipulate loading speeds for specific websites or apps.

Democratic FCC commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel, who had supported the 2015 Net Neutrality regulations, said, "it wasn't enough for this FCC to roll back It actually petitioned the Supreme Court to erase history and wipe out an earlier court decision upholding open internet policies".

However, the court's choice reveals how three conservative judges would rule against prior precedent on net neutrality, with Kavanaugh likely following along based on his prior opinion on the matter.

The U.S. Supreme Court turned away a group of long-pending appeals from the broadband industry over the Obama-era "net neutrality" rule, which barred internet service providers from giving preferential treatment to some web traffic.

"The last administration started DACA without a mandate or even an authorization from Congress or the courts; this administration can therefore end DACA at any time", Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in a statement Monday.

Lyle Denniston has been writing about the Supreme Court since 1958.

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